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  • How to Obtain French Nationality – French Naturalisation UPDATED FEBRUARY 2019

    Posted on 2nd March 2017

    Post Brexit –  Guide to How to Become a French Citizen / obtain French Nationality

     

    UPDATED FEBRUARY 2019*

    Update posted at bottom…

     

    This article is going to assume that you have already made the decision to apply for French citizenship / obtain French nationality and therefore isn’t going to get involved either with the politics of Brexit, nor the benefits and perceived advantages of becoming French.  Rather, this is an honest and full account of the processes and (considerable) paperwork involved in the quest to become French by naturalisation.  Be warned, it is not a quick read.  Arm yourselves with a comfortable chair and a glass of wine.

    Having read countless so-called “Guides to how to become French”, I felt compelled to share my experiences as there seemed to be gaping holes/inaccuracies with other existing “how-to” guides.  Let it be said at the outset, that I claim no special skills or expert status – rather just someone who has spent hours upon hours trawling through the official documentation, rather than the considerable amount of hearsay.  Of course, if there are any inaccuracies/further information comes to light, please comment below and I will amend the article tout de suite.  Apologies in advance for the franglais – sometimes at a loss to find better words.

    So, first things first – this is an article about BECOMING FRENCH BY NATURALISATION OR BY DECRET.   (Naturalisation = by decret).  Furthermore, there appears to be discrepancies as to what different Préfectures demand.  I am principally concerned with the Bordeaux Préfecture (so the departments of Aquitaine – Dordogne, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Gironde & Pyrénéés-Atlantiques).

    There are other routes to becoming French (for example if you are married to someone French/have French ancestry/have a French sibling or you were born in France to non-French parents).  It should be noted that becoming French by naturalisation is not a right, but a favour….

    So, assuming that you don’t have the right to become French, you are then indeed in the category of wishing to become French by naturalisation.  The first hurdle is to be eligible.

     

    Eligibility / Conditions to Become French by Naturalisation

    french markets local produce

    https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F2213

    Age Conditions

    • Be aged 18 or over
    • If you have children under 18 that reside with you, you can apply for them.

     

    Residence

    • You must reside in France (this goes further than being just your address, but must also be the centre of your financial and family interests.  So, for example, if you lived in France but your spouse or children didn’t, French nationality could be refused).
    • You must have resided for at least 5 years in France prior to your demand.  (This can be reduced to 2 years if you have attended a French educational institution or if you fantastically contribute to France, such as being a celebrated scientist or sportsmen, soldier or are a refugee.  This article is concerned principally with the “average” British applicant who will need to fulfil the 5 years residency.   Further details here on reduced residency requirements.
    • You must have a “titre de séjour.”  Hmmmm.  On this one, it is unclear whether this applies to EU nationals applying for nationality.  Will update as I find out more.

     

    Professional Insertion

    • Not quite as painful as it sounds – merely proof that you can support yourself, in essence.

     

    Assimilation into the French Community   

    • Be able to speak French (more on this later).
    • Requirement for the proof of proficiency in French is dispensed with for the over 60s, the handicapped or those with a chronic health condition – their level of French is considered during an interview at the Préfecture.
    • Refugees, or the over 70s (if have lived in France for at least 15 years) do not have to prove their level of French.
    • Must adhere to the principals and values of the French Republic and have a knowledge of its history and culture, which will be checked during an interview at the Préfecture.

     

    Be an all-round “Good Egg”

    • OK, so the official documentation doesn’t quite say that, but essentially you need to not have a criminal record.

     

    Current Nationality

    • Need to disclose all current nationalities that you hold and indicate those you would like to renounce should your application to become French be successful.

     

    Patience

     

    List of Documents Required

    OK, so you think you’re eligible, this is now the nitty-gritty of what is actually required.  Grab the wine.

    • 2 copies of the form Cerfa No 12753*02
    • un timbre fiscal for the amount of 55€
    • photocopy of your valid titre de séjour
    • the proofs of who you are (état civil)
    • the proofs of your income
    • proof of your level of French
    • proofs of your military situation (if applicable)
    • police check if you have resided less than 10 years in France
    • 2 passport photos
    • SAE plus another one “suivie” for 500g

    Ok, so at first glance, it doesn’t look too bad.  However, let’s go through each one…

    chez moutier restaurant dordogne

    Cerfa No 12753*02

    • The form-filling is fairly straightforward so let’s just be thankful for that and only 2 copies are required.

     

    Timbre Fiscal

    • Think of these as like a government postal order.  They can be purchased at certain tabacs.  A Pages Jaunes or Google search of tabacs should find you your local one that sells them (not all tabacs do).  Failing that, your local tax office probably will, though should imagine it’s not likely on your wish list of days out.

     

    Titre de Séjour

    • This may well end up having its own blog.  A photocopy will suffice of your titre de séjour.  Not clear if EU citizens need to produce this.  If anyone has any nuggets of info on this, please comment below.  *NEW INFO*  Have seen it in black and white, with my own eyes, on the Gironde Préfecture site that for UE citizens, a Titre de Séjour is NOT NECESSARY.  Hurray!

     

    Now, it really starts to get fun…At this point,  it would be best if you were single, never married, with no children and have a ready supply of wine.  If you have been married/divorced 3 times with 7 children, I’d probably give up now.

    Etat Civil

    • In essence, you are proving who you are.  What is actually required – original documents, not photocopies, unless states otherwise.  Also, must be accompanied by official translations (google your local “traducteur assermenté”).  As a rough guide, expect to pay 50€/document.  The good news, is that for UK citizens there is no need for the documents to be “Apostillés”.
    • Your birth certificate (must be the long version including both parents’ details)
    • Your parents’ marriage certificate (if applicable)
    • Photocopy of your passport
    • Your marriage certificate (if applicable).  If you have previous marriages, need all previous certificates together with divorce certificates.  If you are widowed, need death certificate.
    • If you have children under 18, you need their long birth certificates, too.
    • OK, so you’ve lost your birth/marriage certificate.  Here’s the link for copies: https://www.gov.uk/order-copy-birth-death-marriage-certificate.  Cost £9.25 each.  Takes about 4 weeks to arrive.

     

    Domicile

    Housing Situation

    • If you rent your home:  Rental contract plus last 3 rent receipts & last phone or electricity bill
    • If you own your home: L’attestation de Propriété – you got this from the Notaire when you bought your property.
    • If you lodge:  Attestion d’Hébergement together with a proof of identity of the person who lodges you.

    Family Situation

    • Titre de Séjour of your Other Half or copy of their passport (if they’re not applying to be French)
    • Titre de Séjour of your parents or copy of their passports (if they are concerned by your application – ie they take care of you)
    • Certificat de Scolarité for the current school year (ask at the school for this)

    South west France large gite with pool

    Ressources

    If you are salaried:

    • Certificats de Travail for the last 3 years (if possible)
    • Current work contract indicating salary, job title and start date
    • Last 3 payslips.  If you’re married, need the last 3 payslips of your OH and their last 3 “Avis d’imposition”

    You are on the dole:

    • Your “inscription” at the Pole d’emploi
    • Your last 3 payment slips
    • Evidence of all jobs over the last 3 years, if possible

    Work Experience:

    • Attestation from the firm you work from with the dates of being/end of your work experience
    • Last payslip
    • If applicable, evidence of all job activity over the last 3 years, if possible.

    Artisan, Agriculteur or Manager:

    • L’extrait d’immatriculation au registre du commerce ou des métiers
    • Status of the company for the directors/associates
    • Balance sheet for the last 3 years
    • the “Bordereau de Situation Fiscale” of your company (ie tax return)

    Profession Libérale:

    • Copy of your enrolment
    • Last 3 years’ proof of income

    Student:

    • Certificat de Scolarité or Carte d’inscription if at Uni
    • Diplomas (Bac) etc from French institutions
    • If your parents support you, you need a photocopy of their titre de séjour or passport and their last Avis d’imposition.  If they live abroad, a copy of the payments they have sent you.

    Income from Property in France or abroad:

    • A document dated and signed establishing the nature, origin and valuation of your holdings
    • A bank attestation showing the amount and regularity of your income if originating from abroad

    You rent out Property:

    • Copy of the rental contract(s)

    You receive Social Security Payments (including family allowance):

    • Your latest CAF attestation (“bordereau de versement des allocations familiales, de l’allocation logement, du revenu de solidarité active, etc)

    Other Cases: (No, you’re not off the hook…)

    • Pension statement and last pension payslip, if you are retired
    • If handicapped, the decision from the Commission des droits of your handicap
    • La carte d’invalidité et le bordereau de versement d’une pension ou d’une allocation d’invalidité
    • If married/living together, the last 3 payslips of your OH together with the last 3 years’ avis d’imposition
    • If your OH (or third party) takes care of you financially, a proof of income of them (see all the stuff above)

    Situation Fiscale (What do you mean all that lot above isn’t enough?)

    • 3 years’ avis d’impositions (tax slips) together with payslips from November & December for the last 3 years
    • The really fun “bordereau de situation fiscale modèle P.237” – no point translating this.  It needs to be dated within 3 months of the date you submit your dossier.  Good luck with that one.  It is essentially a statement from your tax office declaring you are up to date with all your taxes.  Highly recommend you send a letter – example below – to your local tax office, but make sure it is signed for, lest it be filed in the bin.
    • If you are married etc you need 3 years’ avis d’impositions (tax slips) together with payslips from November & December for the last 3 years of your OH.

    l'entrecote restaurant bordeaux

    Proof you can speak French

    • Any French type qualification that wasn’t issued by a French-speaking country is essentially worthless.  So, even if you have a Masters in French from Oxford, the following applies to you, too:
    • You can either get an attestation  TCF (Test du Connaissance du Français).  This is the cheapest route.  The test is oral only and you need to get at least a level B1.  Attestation is valid for 2 years only.  Need to register at least 4 weeks prior to exam to be accepted, and results take about 3 weeks to arrive (though happy to report that mine were in 2 weeks to the day).  Costs around 100€.  Here is the list of the current options for Aquitaine: http://www.gironde.gouv.fr/content/download/31450/223746/file/ASSIMILATION+LINGUISTIQUE+%E2%80%93+ORGANISMES+HABILITES.pdf
    • or if you have a DELF/DALF diploma of at least level B1.  Test is both written and oral and costs from around 200€.

     

    Military Situation

    • For former servicemen status of service and medals received

     

    Casier Judiciare Etranger

    • A police check – if you have lived in France for less than 10 years, you must produce a police check for either the country you have previously lived in or the country of your nationality.  For UK nationals the link is: https://www.acro.police.uk/police_certificates.aspx Costs £45 and takes about 3 weeks.  Needs 2 passport photos.

    child friendly villa in france near sunflowers

     

    So What do I actually Need and Where do I start?

    Good questions.  As much of what you need is date-sensitive, you need to have the organisational skills of a rooster in a chicken farm.  My humble suggestions as to the order of play is:

    1. Book yourself on a TCF.  This is your crucial date.  Depending on how confident you are as to your abilities, you can work out that you should have your attestation in your hand approx in 2 months’ time.
    2. Start tearing your house apart for birth and marriage certificates.  Order new ones here
    3. Find yourself an approved translator.  In the Dordogne, can recommend Prudence Benatar.  Best get in touch and make an appointment for 2 months hence.  You can scan over what you need translating and then go in person to collect/pay.  At this point you will need to show original certificates.
    4. Buy yourself a lot of printer ink, paper, folders, passport photos and wine.
    5. Request Certificats de Scolarité.
    6. Send a recorded letter to your tax office asking for your P237.
    7. Apply for your police check.
    8. Check you are able to log onto the CAF website (if you have children).  If not, need to start requesting log in details now.  Right at the last minute, you need to request your CAF “bordereau” – can do this online.
    9. Here’s a link to a French FAQ: http://www.gironde.gouv.fr/FAQ/FAQ/Foire-aux-questions-sur-les-naturalisations

     

    List of Documents

    Here is a suggested “contents” letter format of what you may need to submit with your dossier.  Maybe pop the lot in a nice rabat avec élastiques, non?

     

    SURNAME Name

    Address

    Email

    Phone

     

    LISTE PIECES FOURNIES

     

    • CERFA  12753*02 en double exemplaire
    • Timbre fiscale 55 €

     

    JUSTIFICATIFS DE MON ETAT CIVIL

    • Mon acte de naissance (en original avec traduction)
    • L’acte de naissance de ma mère (en original avec traduction)
    • L’acte de naissance de mon père (en original avec traduction)
    • Certificat de marriage de mes parents (en original avec traduction)
    • Mon certificat de marriage (en original avec traduction)
    • Copie de mon passeport
    • Certificate de naissance de mon fils mineur (en original avec traduction)

     

    DOMICILE ET RESSOURCES

    • L’acte de Propriété
    • Certificat de Scolarité pour mon fils mineur
    • Certificats de Travail
    • Trois derniers bulletins de salaire
    • Attestation d’être pris en charge de mon mari
    • Copie du passeport de mon mari
    • L’étrait d’immatriculation au registre du commerce (au nom de mon mari)
    • Justificatif des ressources des trois dernières années – RSI (au nom de mon mari)
    • Dernier bordereau de CAF
    • Titre de pension (mon mari)
    • Dernier bordereau de versement d’une pension (au nom de mon mari)

     

    CONNAISSANCE DE LA LANGUE FRANCAISE

    • Attestation TCF (en original accompagné de sa photocopie)

     

    SITUATION FISCALE

    • Les avis d’imposition des trois dernières années (au nom de mon mari)
    • Bordereau de situation fiscale P.237 (au nom de mon mari)

     

    CASIER JUDICIAIRE ETRANGER

    • Extrait casier judiciaire (en original avec traduction)

     

    DIVERS

    • 2 photographies d’identité
    • Une envelope timbrée à mon adresse
    • Une lettre « suivie » 500g

     

    Request for P237

    Here is an example letter to apply to your tax office for the P237.

    Mme Surname

    Your address

    Post code

    Town

    Centre des Finances Publiques

    TRESORERIE Town

    Address

    Post code Town

     

    Madame, Monsieur

     

    J’ai besoin d’un bordereau de situation fiscale (imprimé n° P237), AU MON NOM (Name SURNAME) pour les trois dernières années, qui atteste que je suis à jour du paiement de mes impôts.  Je vous remercie d’avance.

     

    Impôts sur le Revenu

    Numéro Fiscal (find these numbers on previous years avis)

    Déclarant 1 : 00 00 000 000 000 C

    Déclarant 2 : 00 00 000 000 000 C

    Référence de l’Avis : 00 00 A000000 00

    Numéro FIP : 000 00 00 0000000000 0

     

     

    Taxes Foncières

    Numéro Fiscal : 00 00 000 000 000 C

    Référence de l’avis : 00 00 0000000 00

    Numéro de propriétaire : 000 H00000 V

    Débiteur légal : PROPR/INDIVIS 0752 MCJPKV M SURNAME NAME

     

    Taxe D’Habitation

    Numéro Fiscal : 00 00 000 000 000 C

    Référence de l’avis : 00 00 0000000 00

     

    Je vous prie de croire, Monsieur/Madame, à l’assurance de mes salutations distinguées.

    Madame Name SURNAME

     

    Attestations

    Here are a couple of attestations that may be helpful:

    ATTESTATION DE PRISE EN CHARGE

     

    Je soussigné Monsieur NAME

    N° du passeport) :

    Né le : date à town, Royaume-Uni

    Profession :

    N° de téléphone :

    Adresse électronique :

     

    M’engage à subvenir à tous les besoins (nourriture, entretien, frais d’hospitalisation ou soins médicaux, hébergement) de Madame NAMEsans avoir recours aux aides publiques, attestant pour ce faire avoir des ressources suffisantes.

     

    N° du passeport) :

    Né  le : date  à town,  Royaume-Uni

    N° de téléphone :

    Adresse électronique :

    Adresse:

     

     

    Fait à : town

    Le : date

     

    ATTESTATION D’HEBERGEMENT

    Name, SURNAME

    Address

    postcode – TOWN

     

    Préfecture de la Gironde

    2 Esplanade Charles de Gaulle

    33000 – BORDEAUX

     

     

    À town, le 17 month 2016

     

     

     

    Objet : attestation d’hébergement

     

     

    Madame, Monsieur,

     

    Je soussigné, SURNAME Name, né le 6 month year, à Town, Royaume-Uni et demeurant au address, atteste sur l’honneur que SURNAME, Name, né le 5 month year à town, Royaume-Uni  est actuellement hébergé à mon domicile situé address

     

    Veuillez agréer, Madame, Monsieur, l’expression de mes salutations distinguées.

     

     

     

     

    SURNAME Name

    Final Notes

    If you have found this article useful, please do drop me a comment below.  Please no copying/pasting without giving due credit – please respect the work that has gone into this and link back to this article.  Any questions, please yell – ask here via the comments, as I don’t necessarily have the time/inclination to check in on every forum.  Lastly, I will update with progress reports and bonne chance to all who decide to head down the path of becoming French 

    chateau monbazillac large self catering accommodation

    UPDATE!

    My dossier was sent the 14th December 2016.  I received a letter, dated the 20th December 2016, from Bordeaux Préfecture – an “Attestation depot de dossier.”

    I also know of someone else who sent in their dossier (also to Bordeaux Préfecture) around the same time.  On her attestation she was told she was missing a document and to send it in straightaway.  So, the good news seems to be that as soon as the dossiers are received, they are checked that they are complete.  So, now I shall sit and wait until the next stage!

     

    UPDATE OCTOBER 2018

    So, after nearly 2 years, I have finally heard back from the Préfecture.  Apparently, as my dossier has sat in a cupboard for 2 years, it needs to be updated.  However, don’t go thinking this is the case of just a couple of extra documents….the list I was asked for was actually far more than the original dossier and came to 70 sheets of A4. 

    The letter from the Préfecture asked for:

    • 1 photo
    • 1 justificatif de domicile – de 3 mois (eau, gaz, éléctricité….)
    • certificat de scolarité 2018/2019 pour X
    • certificat de travail récent et la copie de vos 3 dernières fiches de paye
    • Kbis – de 3 mois our votre gîte touristique
    • copies des déclarations du chiffre d’affaire pour 2016 et 2017
    • attestation à jour des cotisations sociales liées à l’activité
    • copie de l’inscription du gîte en mairie
    • bordereau de situation fiscale P237 mentionnant les taxes et impôts pour votre gîte et vous pour 2016 et 2017
    • attestation sur l’honneur précisant votre date d’entrée en France et fournir des justificatifs de vote présence en France de 2008 à 2015 (impôts…)
    • attestation sur l’honneur précisant le montant de remboursement de crédit pour votre maison (en euros)
    • copies de vos avis d’imposition 2018 (revenus 2017) et 2017 (revenus 2016)
    • attestation de la CAF de décembre 2016 à ce jour
    • justificatif de la rente de votre conjoint pour 2017, 2018 (traduit en français par un traducteur assermenté et les sommes en euros)

     

     

    Here is a copy of the letter:

    french nationality 2018 brexit

     

    One of my offspring (majeur) who has also applied in his own right, at the same time, also had a letter demanding approximately the same amount of stuff…but different things.  Both letters for him and me were received the 27th September, and the Gendarmerie phoned him the next day to arrange an interview.  I, however, have heard nothing from the Gendarmerie, 19 day later!

    So, my only advice is this:  if you are thinking of applying, you better be squeaky clean….and have to hand every piece of paper proving that you have paid every tax, legally registered your business, schooled your children in France, where you have been living etc etc.

    More updates to follow as I have news.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    uPDATE DECEMBER 2018

    10 December – finally received a phone call from the Gendarmerie for me to have my interview – 10 weeks after my son, despite us having the same dossier number!  The (very nice) Gendarme informed me the letter had got lost in the system (vague as to whether the Préfecture’s or the Gendarmerie’s).

    So, underwent my interview same day.  Questions asked were

    • Why I wished to be French. 
    • When had I first come to France – did I used to holiday here.
    • Did I hold a French driving licence.
    • What my profession is/what qualifications I held.
    • Have I ever worked in France.
    • Have I got any qualifications in France.
    • How did I learn French.
    • Am I a member of any clubs/associations.
    • Any further information I would like to mention.

    So, it was really straightforward.  The only documentation required was my passport and a copy was taken.  My answers were typed up and I was asked to sign.  The whole interview was done and dusted in about 10 minutes.  The two Gendarmes (was a shared office) were at pains to reassure me that I would get Nationality….

    Incidentally, was at the Préfecture a couple of weeks ago for OH’s Carte de Séjour, and I asked the very nice lady on the desk if it was necessary for me and the offspring to apply for Cartes de Séjour, seeing as we are fairly far-advanced in the Naturalisation process.  She took my dossier number and disappeared in the back to confer with the Naturalisation bods.  Reappeared 10 minutes later to inform me that our dossiers were not high priority and would not be concluded by Brexit so, yes, we did indeed need to apply for Cartes de Séjours.

    Deep joy!

     

    SECOND uPDATE DECEMBER 2018

    Further to my Gendarme interview on the 10th December (4 days ago) – convocation has arrived from the Préfecture with my interview date – 6th February.  So, if one were to extrapolate info from the treatment times of my dossier:

    Dossier receipted 15/12/2016

    Letter requesting updates 27/09/2018

    Gendarme interview (my son) 28/09/2018

    Gendarme interview (me) 10/12/2018 (letter was dated September but had been lost according to Gendarmerie).

    Convocations for both received 14/12/2018 for interview dates 06/02/2019 (out of interest, only passport required at interview for me, yet student son requires passport plus has to present a UK police check plus its translation plus all his French diplomas (originals not copies).

     

    So, 21 months for first contact requesting updates.

    Then 1 day (or 2.5 months if letter is lost!) for Gendarme interview.

    Convocation received 2.5 months (or 4 days!) after Gendarme interview.

    Date set for nearly 8 weeks hence from receipt of convocation which is nearly 26 months from submitting original dossier. 

    So there you have it – the only things you need are an iron will, a love of paperwork and patience (and don’t forget the wine).

     

    ENTRETIEN PREFECTURE BORDEAUX

    Top tip:  On entering the Préfecture, don’t join the queue, but follow the orange line on the floor (or maybe the yellow?) to the back of the hall.  There you will find on the back left the “orange zone” or on the right the “yellow zone”.  On the table is a telephone where you can announce your arrival.  My appointment was at 11h, but I arrived at 10h10.  Let them know I was there, and they saw me within a few minutes.  The reason they make many of the appointments for 11h onwards is they can see people don’t live in Bordeaux, and it’s to give you time to arrive.

    The questions

    The first questions were just confirming information – date of arrival in France, ages of children, your job (if you have one), whether you hold assets outside of France and what links (family/monetary) you have outside of France and what links you have in France.  What languages you speak in your household. 

    Questions I can pretty much remember are the following:

    Combien de fois rentrez-vous à votre pays?

    Faites-vous partie d’une association?

    Envoyez-vous de l’argent à votre pays d’origine?

    Quelle est la devise de la République?

    Qu’est-ce que c’est la laïcité?

    C’est quoi la démocratie?

    Quels sont les droits et devoirs des citoyens français?

    Quels sont les symboles de la France?

    Citez des fleuves en France?

    Enumérez des personnages français connus.

    Qui est la Marianne?

    Quel est l’hymne national de la France?

    Dans quel départment habitez-vous?

    Savez-vous les 5 départments d’Aquitaine?

    Donnez les noms de grandes villes françaises.

    Quelle est l’emblème de la France?

    Citez quelques monuments.

    Quels sont les pays frontaliers avec la France?

    Donnez le nom de littéraires français et les titres de leurs écrits.

    A-t-on le droit de porter des signes religieux dans les endroits publics?

    Quel événement de l’histoire de France vous a-t-il marqué?

    A quelle date précise a eu la Révolution?

    Qui était le roi pendant la Révolution?

    Donnez-moi les dates des 2 guerres mondiales?

    Dans quelle République sommes-nous?

    Donnez le nom de rois français.

    Qu’est ce que la philosophie des Lumières?

    Citez un philosophe français des lumières.

    Quel est le nom du Président actuel et le précédent?

    Donnez le nom de quelques ministres actuels?

    Qui est le premier ministre?

     

    Then right at the end…

    Pourquoi voulez-vous devenir français?

    C’est quoi la place de la France sur le paysage mondial?

    Citez les raisons la France est bien connu dans le monde?

     

    All in all, the interview lasted about 30 minutes.  The agent was very nice and gave me back the originals of various certicates that formed part of my dossier.  I was informed that because I live in Gironde, the dossiers are sent more quickly than those who live, in say, Dordogne.  I was given a time-frame of about a week for my dossier to be sent off to the Minister, with a further expected wait of 6 – 8 months before I would know whether or not.  (Informally, I was told that as far as the agent was concerned it was “favorable”, but ultimately, the decision rests with the Minister).

    Was also told, informally, that there is a lot of sympathy for Brits with the whole Brexit debacle and they are prioritising their applications to get them through as quickly as possible.  Good news if you are British (about the only good news if you are British!) and not so good if you are another nationality also trying for naturalisation.  A quicker route is certainly by marriage!

    I cannot stress enough just how helpful everyone I have met officially has been.  I have been overwhelmed by the sympathy (for Brexit) and the kindness shown.  Feel very lucky to live in such a welcoming country.  Vive la France!

    So, we wait some more….until the next update, folks 🙂

     

     

     

     

     

    14 Replies to “How to Obtain French Nationality – French Naturalisation UPDATED FEBRUARY 2019”

    1. Jane Gore says:

      I was given a link to your website by Prudence Benatar who is translating the stuff I need for this complex naturalisation process. I am very grateful for all your help and guidance as I’d almost decided not to bother when I found out what it would involve. I’m sure you’ve made it easier for many sad victims of Brexit to remain European and, yes, I certainly needed the wine. Thanks very much.

      1. adminleverger says:

        Bonne chance with it all 🙂

    2. Jacqueline Withers says:

      This is incredibly helpful thank you. A question re the birth certificates of parents – not mentioned in your English list but included in the justificatifs in French. Are these needed if both parents are mentioned on my birth certificate do you know?

      1. adminleverger says:

        Hi, yes I included both parents’ birth certificates.

    3. Nic says:

      Excellent summary.

      A couple of confirmations:

      No carte seymour required for EU citizens but you must be able to provide 5 years of tax returns instead.

      No criminal record check required if you have been in France for 10 years but again need to prove this (a letter from our Maire was sufficient).

      Comment for anyone applying in Midi-Pyrenees:

      You can no longer submit the dossier by post. You have to apply for an appointment to submit it and will be interviewed at the same time. It can take a very long time to get a slot and it is a soul destroying process. You have to apply online and 99% of the time you go to the website it tells you there are no appointments available. I nearly fell off my chair when it eventually offered me a date in what I thought was 3 weeks time – only when I read it again did I realise it was 1 YEAR and 3 weeks! That time has now passed and we have had our interviews. In the meantime I regularly visited the website to try and get an earlier time but was never again offered even a single date.

      We are now on stage 2 which is an interview at the local police station after which they will apparently visit the house.

      At the end of the interviews we were told to expect the process to take around a year to conclude.

      1. adminleverger says:

        By Bordeaux Préfecture standards you’re doing well! We dream of only a year! Bordeaux are currently dealing with applications (time of writing is Dec 17) from summer 2015. Yes, not a typo – 2015. So, roughly 2 – 2 1/2 years after sending in dossier, they may actually pick it up! Only then will interview appointments be made (several months after).

    4. Nic says:

      Carte sejour not seymour (damn spell checker!!)

    5. Xax McCarthy says:

      Many thanks for this De! Having followed the list on the Bordeaux site, and having posted my dossier..I can see Im likely to get requests for info on my husband’s finances too now. Printing it all off in readiness now just in case!
      This is a great resource and may I suggest you share it regularly on the Nationality site if you can spare the time?

      1. adminleverger says:

        Please feel free to share – the more people it can help the better (I’m not on Facebook). Merci!

    6. Richard Brown says:

      This is really helpful. I haven’t started the process yet but this has given me the impetus to get going. Many thanks

      1. adminleverger says:

        Bonne chance!

    7. Claire OWEN says:

      Very comprehensive write up, thank you. Just one heads up I did mine in Midi Pyrenees and they need a declaration from the CAF if you have had CAF OR if you haven’t had CAF. So put that down as one of the 1st things to get if you haven’t ever had dealings with the CAF. Because if you haven’t dealt with the CAF they take forever to deal with you.

      1. adminleverger says:

        Good point. Luckily for us, we started dealings with CAF shortly after our arrival, so to get the required attestation was, amazingly, as simple as downloading it from their website!

    8. David Bissix says:

      A very useful aid. I have looked and read many different publications but I believe this to the most helpful and precise giving very clear advice. I am sure that the various prefectures are currently inundated with applications
      A BIG thanks for bothering to go to the trouble of producing this. Very Kind Regards.

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